How to support personal care routines that meet the individual needs of children or young people and

Access to Records Philosophy NACAC believes that every adopted person has the right, at the age of majority, to receive personal information about his or her birth, foster, and adoption history, including medical information, and educational and social history.

How to support personal care routines that meet the individual needs of children or young people and

Start with initial assessment and move on to further assessment if, for example, intervention has not been effective or the function of the behaviour is not clear see recommendations 1. Develop a behaviour support plan see recommendation 1. Ensure that feedback is personalised and involves a family member, carer or advocate to support the person and help them to understand the feedback if needed.

Initial assessment of behaviour that challenges 1. Consider using a formal rating scale for example, the Aberrant Behavior Checklist or Adaptive Behavior Scale to provide baseline levels for the behaviour and a scale such as the Functional Analysis Screening Tool to help understand its function.

Use this to develop a behaviour support plan see recommendation 1. Ensure that the behaviour support plan includes risk management see recommendation 1. Further assessment of behaviour that challenges 1.

Carry out a functional assessment see recommendations 1. Consider using formal for example, the Adaptive Behavior Scale or the Aberrant Behavior Checklist and idiographic personalised measures to assess the severity of the behaviour and the progress of any intervention.

Functional assessment of behaviour 1. After further assessment 1. Interventions for behaviour that challenges 1. Bear in mind that the sensory profile may change. Monitor the effects on behaviour that challenges and adjust the plan in discussion with the person and their family members or carers.

Only offer antipsychotic medication in combination with psychological or other interventions. When risks to the person with a learning disability or others are significant, or breakdown in their living arrangements is very likely, consider using reactive strategies as an initial intervention and introduce proactive interventions once the situation stabilises.

Use a graded approach that considers the least restrictive alternatives first. Encourage the person and their family members or carers to be involved in planning and reviewing reactive strategies whenever possible. Document and review the delivery and outcome of the restrictive intervention and discuss these with everyone involved in the care of the person, including their family members and carers, and with the person if possible.

Document their use as part of an incident record and use this in personal and organisational debrief procedures to inform future behaviour support planning and organisational learning. Adjust the nature, content and delivery of the interventions to take into account the impact of the person's learning disability and behaviour that challenges.

If medication is needed to aid sleep, consider melatonin[ 2 ]. The prescriber should follow relevant professional guidance, taking full responsibility for the decision. Informed consent should be obtained and documented.

See the General Medical Council's Prescribing guidance:1 NQS PLP e-Newsletter No. 29 Health, safety and wellbeing Setting the scene Children’s health and safety is about more than just their physical wellbeing; it also.

CHCICSA Provide support to meet personal care needs Date this document was generated: 27 May Processes and strategies to support people with personal care needs CHCICSA Provide support to meet personal care needs Date this document was generated: 27 May Regulation 5 sets out overarching requirements that run across all of the Quality Standards.

To meet the aspirations embodied in the Quality Standards, children’s homes need to connect with and be part of the wider support system for each child in their care.

How to support personal care routines that meet the individual needs of children or young people and

• review our care plans and protocols regularly to ensure they meet changing needs • ensure all staff will support pupils with personal care needs. • facilitate effective handwashing routines in young children.

How To Support Personal Care Routines That Meet The Individual Needs Of Children Or Young People And Promote Their Independence. for Children’s Care Learning and Development (QCF) Qualification Specification Unit title: Contribute to the support of the positive environments for children and young people Unit number: .

Children gain from planned care and education which integrates able-bodied children and children with special needs. This contact at an early age may facilitate understanding that all people have equal value irrespective of ability or mobility.

Autism spectrum disorder in under 19s: support and management | Guidance and guidelines | NICE