The european role in the trans atlantic slave trade

Their sweat and blood served as a bedstone to the tremendous wealth still enjoyed in Europe and the Americas. The discovery of the New World boosted the European economy and marked the starting point of what one can call the "African nightmare.

The european role in the trans atlantic slave trade

For centuries, tidal currents had made ocean travel particularly difficult and risky for the ships that were then available, and as such there had been very little, if any, maritime contact between the peoples living in these continents. Between andapproximatelysailors engaged in the slave trade visited West Africa.

In particular, European traders wanted to trade for goldwhich could be found in western Africa, and also to find a maritime route to "the Indies" Indiawhere they could trade for luxury goods such as spices without having to obtain these items from Middle Eastern Islamic traders. This diversity led Thornton to describe the initial "exploration of the Atlantic" as "a truly international exercise, even if many of the dramatic discoveries were made under the sponsorship of the Iberian monarchs".

That leadership later gave rise to the myth that "the Iberians were the sole leaders of the exploration". Slavery in Africa Group of men, children, and women being taken to a slave market Slavery was prevalent in many parts of Africa [15] for many centuries before the beginning of the Atlantic slave trade.

The european role in the trans atlantic slave trade

There is evidence that enslaved people from some parts of Africa were exported to states in Africa, Europe, and Asia prior to the European colonization of the Americas. As Elikia M'bokolo wrote in Le Monde diplomatique: The African continent was bled of its human resources via all possible routes.

At least ten centuries of slavery for the benefit of the Muslim countries from the ninth to the nineteenth Four million enslaved people exported via the Red Seaanother four million [17] through the Swahili ports of the Indian Oceanperhaps as many as nine million along the trans-Saharan caravan route, and eleven to twenty million depending on the author across the Atlantic Ocean.

Thornton, Europeans usually bought enslaved people who were captured in endemic warfare between African states. European colonization and slavery in West Africa This section relies largely or entirely on a single source.

Relevant discussion may be found on the talk page. Please help improve this article by introducing citations to additional sources. April The Portuguese presenting themselves before the Manikongo. The Portuguese initially fostered a good relationship with the Kingdom of Kongo.

Civil War within Kongo would lead to many of its subjects ending up as enslaved people in Portuguese and other European vessels.

Map of Africa Today - Regions Visited by European Slave Traders (United Nations, January, ). A map of Africa today is shown; the sub-Sahara region, not including South Africa, is where the European slave traders were active. the atlantic slave trade and slavery in america. your starting point for slavery information and sources. sitemap contact us. Slavery Regions for the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade. Alistair Boddy-Evans Slaves for the Trans-Atlantic slave trade were initially sourced in Senegambia and the Windward Coast. Around the trade moved to west-central Africa (the Kingdom of the Kongo and neighboring Angola).

Upon discovering new lands through their naval explorations, European colonisers soon began to migrate to and settle in lands outside their native continent. Off the coast of Africa, European migrants, under the directions of the Kingdom of Castileinvaded and colonised the Canary Islands during the 15th century, where they converted much of the land to the production of wine and sugar.

Along with this, they also captured native Canary Islanders, the Guanchesto use as slaves both on the Islands and across the Christian Mediterranean.

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For instance, Portuguese traders attempted to conquer the Bissagos Islands in Although Kongo later joined a coalition in to force the Portuguese out, Portugal had secured a foothold on the continent that it continued to occupy until the 20th century.

Inthe Kongolese king, Afonso Iseized a French vessel and its crew for illegally trading on his coast. The Guyanese historian Walter Rodney has argued that it was an unequal relationship, with Africans being forced into a "colonial" trade with the more economically developed Europeans, exchanging raw materials and human resources i.

He argued that it was this economic trade agreement dating back to the 16th century that led to Africa being underdeveloped in his own time.Jan 29,  · The Atlantic slave trade The Bible and slavery The Bible contains references to slavery ©.

Like most holy books, the Bible can be used to support particular viewpoints, and . Featured Topic - Europe and the Slave Trade.

Given that the transatlantic slave trade was a global phenomenon, in which a large number of European states took part, it is worth looking at their respective roles within it and how these different countries have dealt with the memory and commemoration of slavery.

The Arabs played an important role as middlemen in the trans-atlantic slave trade, and research data suggest that between the 7th and the 19th centuries, they transported more than 14 million black slaves across the Sahara and the Red Sea, as many or more than were shipped to the Americas, depending on the estimates for the transatlantic slave.

Jun 25,  · There are a few trends worth noting. As the first European states with a major presence in the New World, Portugal and Spain dominate the opening century of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade (Essay) The Trans-Atlantic slave trade had a massive impact the British, West Indies, Africa, and the emerging African American culture.

The British were impacted with massive profits, to the disadvantage of many parts of Africa, where large amounts of men and women from all around the continent were forced into slavery.

Some historians argue that if churches had used their power, the Atlantic slave trade might have never occurred. By the same logic, others argue that the Catholic church and Catholic missionaries could have also helped to prevent the colonization and brutality of colonialism in Africa.

BBC - Religions - Christianity: Atlantic slave trade and abolition